Category: Mutton


Rangooni rice

This is one of the easiest, simplest and tastiest dishes that I have tasted with mutton. I came across this recipe on Pree’s blog and fell in love with it at first sight. Although I couldn’t wait to try it, I was sceptical that my family will even taste it as it has hardly any spices that mutton is usually cooked at our place. So, to be on safer side, I cooked it in meagre quantity just enough for myself. And guess what? I had to share the dish between the other three and was also admonished as to why I had made so less quantity of such a beautiful dish! From then on, this dish makes a regular appearance on our dinner table specially during winters when all you want is light soupy meals that are filling. I have tweaked Pree’s original recipe slightly to make it even more easier and to suit our palate. Try it and you will be impressed by its taste for sure.

Ingredients:

  • Mutton – 500 g (preferable bone in, but I have even made it with boneless meat)
  • Basmati / jasmine rice (Any fragrant rice would do, I prefer jasmine)
  • Ginger paste (1 tsp)
  • Salt to taste
  • Oil -2 tbsp
  • Garlic – sliced into thin roundels (10-15 cloves, the more the merrier)
  • Red chillies – 5 (or as per taste)
  • Lemon juice – 2 tsp

Method:

  1. In a pressure cooker add mutton, rice, ginger paste, salt and enough water to cook all this. Cook till 7-8 whistles (1-2 on high and rest on low flame)
  2. Once the pressure is released, open the cooker and mash the rice and mutton slightly so that they are well blended but not completely mashed. There should be small pieces of mutton soft mushy grains of rice.
  3. Add water if required to make it dense but not runny. The consistency should be that of a thick soup. Adjust salt at this stage. Keep it aside
  4. Heat oil in a pan and fry the dry red chillies till they are crisp, remove from oil and keep aside. Once cool, crush them with fingers to make flakes (Use gloves if necessary)
  5. In the same oil, fry the garlic roundels till they are crispy brown. Add this oil on the rice meat stew along with crushed chillies and lemon juice.
  6. Eat while it is hot.

 

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While a language can be the best medium of communication, choice and order of words could easily alter the intended meaning and mis-interpret one’s purpose. My post marriage exploration of Bengali language has been fun and a few goof-ups that I did are inseparable from my memory. People ask me how I learnt Bengali so quick! The secret to it was simple. I kept speaking it irrespective of it being broken or mis-pronounced. Because, people around me would correct the mistakes and I learnt with every incorrect sentence. Imitating Ma (my MIL) also accelerated the process as she narrates the same stories to each person atleast 100 times and I almost memorized her unperturbed and unaltered speeches!
It was one of those initial months of marriage and I was asked to speak to Abbas’ aunt who was going to visit us the next day. I kicked off easily as I had mastered the ‘How are you?’, ‘I’m fine’ business in Bengali flawlessly by then. I then went a bit overboard and thought of asking her to come for lunch the next day. I confidently uttered – “Apni kalke khete ashben to?” I could hear chuckles and giggles around me and I wondered what was wrong. It was later when I hung up the phone that I came to know that what I asked her literally meant – “Are you coming to eat tomorrow?” What an embarrassment!
Why I am talking about all this while I post this Mutton curry here? I again messed up with the language even after 5 years of my Bong quest. But this time I was proficient enough to see the wrong usage of my words and immediately corrected myself. Abbas fondly asked me to cook Mutton curry for dinner that night. And as usual I wanted it to be something different than the version I already have in my blog (Talk about agonies of a food blogger) I thought of preparing it the same way but adding Ghongura or Sorrel leaves to make it a new post in my blog. Ma heard my conversation with Abbas and knew that I was gonna cook Mutton in a way even her ancestors might have never dreamt of… While I was busy sautéing the Mutton and Potatoes, she came in whiffing in the air and said “Kisher ekta gondho asche… Shaag dichho na ki?” Meaning “I smell something strange, are you adding greens?” I was just cleaning the greens by then. Guess what I told her “Apnar moner moddhye gondho ache…” Meaning “The stink is in your mind”. Shockingly she asked if her mind stinks??? I came to know that I had put across my words wrongly yet again!!! I instantly (and politely this time) said No I meant that since you already know that I am adding greens to Mutton, it is just your presumption about the smell. I have still not cleaned the Sorrel leaves. She got my point and I was relieved!!! Sigh…
Going to the recipe:
Ingredients:
Mutton – 1 kg
Tomatoes – 1 medium sized, chopped
Potatoes – 5-6 medium sized, peeled and cut into halves.
Curd – 1/2 cup
Turmeric powder – 1 tsp
Salt – to taste
Oil – 4 tbsp
Sorrel leaves / Ghongura leaves – 1 bunch, pluck leaves and thoroughly wash a couple of times

To grind to a paste:
Onion – 3 medium sized
Ginger – 2” piece
Garlic – 7-8 pods

For the masala powder:
Red chillies – 10-15
Coriander – 1 tbsp
Cumin – 2 tsp
Cardamom – 2-3
Cloves – 4-5
Cinnamon – 1” stick

Method:

1. Marinate the mutton with onion-ginger-garlic paste, curd, turmeric powder and salt and keep in the refrigerator for a minimum of 30 mins, the longer the better.

2. Dry roast the ingredients called for under the masala powder head and grind them to a fine powder. (I microwave the masalas instead on high for a min)

3. Heat oil in a heavy bottomed vessel. Add a tsp of salt and a pinch of turmeric powder. Drop in potato pieces on a high flame. Stir for 2-3 mins. Lower the flame and cook covered till the potatoes turn golden on all sides. Remove them from the oil and keep aside.

4. Heat oil in a heavy bottomed vessel and add the marinated meat along with chopped tomatoes and cook on a low flame. The meat gets cooked in its own juices. Occasionally stir and cook till all the water gets evaporated from the mutton and oil oozes out from the sides. This process might take an hour even.

5. Now combine the mutton, fried potatoes, washed Sorrel / Ghongura leaves and the masala powder in a pressure cooker. Add water to suit your desired consistency. You may adjust salt at this stage. Pressure cook for 1 or 2 whistles.

Here’s another delicacy from Geeta Pachhi…

For the Meat Balls:
Mutton Kheema – 1 pound (wash thorughly, drain the water and grind till it is blended may b for 2 to 3 minutes (some people do not grind it)
Chopped onion – 1 tbsp
Chopped ginger – 1 tbsp
Chopped garlic – 1/2 tbsp
Chopped coriander leaves – 6 tbsp
Garam masala powder – 1 tbsp
Red chilli powder – 1 tbsp
Putani powder – 1 tbsp
Beaten egg – 1 (optional)
Salt to taste
Oil – 1/2 cup

Add these ingredients to the kheema and mix it thoroughly till small balls can be done. Make small balls and keep aside. Heat oil and fry the balls on low fire till it done. The balls should not be over fried. When the color of the balls in heated oil changes, they should b removed from oil and kept aside.
For the Masala
Grated coconut – 1 cup
Cloves – 7 to 8
Cinnamon – 1″ piece 
Green cardamom – 3
Coriander seeds – 3 tbsp
Cumin – 1 tsp
Poppy seeds – 1/2 tsp
Black pepper corns – 3-4 
Onion – 1 large sized chopped in to big pieces 
Red chilli powder – 2 tbsp or as per spice tolerance    

1. Heat little oil and add cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, coriander seeds, cumin seeds, poppy seeds, black pepper corns and stir for a minute.
2. Add the coconut gratings and chopped onion to it and stir on the fire for some time (about 2 to 3  minutes)
3. Add chilli powder, grind all together to a paste 
For the curry
Onion – 1 small, finely chopped
Ginger garlic paste – 1tbsp
Tomatoes – 2 medium sized, chopped
Salt to taste

1. Once all the meat balls are fried, in the same oil add chopped onion, ginger garlic paste and stir till it is light  brown in color and then add the chopped tomatoes and stir till it  becomes mushy. 
2. Add ground masala and stir till it leaves oil.
3. Add water, salt and simmer and add the cooked kheema balls and simmer for 2 , 3 minutes .
4. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves
5. Serve with Jolad rotis (Jowar rotis) or chapatis.
Kosha Mangsho is one of the numerous Bengali dishes to salivate over. I never ate mutton before my marriage coz the variety I had tasted in Kundapur was very hard. When Abbas had asked me before marriage, which of the two I liked more – chicken or mutton? Without a thought, I had replied Chicken. Post marriage when I tasted this dish, I instantly developed a strong inclination towards mutton. It simply melted in the mouth and it was heavenly!!! You have to eat it to feel it.
Well, the recipe that I’m sharing today is not a pure Bengali Kosha Mangsho version. I have tweaked the recipe a bit. I had seen Chef Marut Sikka cooking Rajasthani Laal Mangsho on TV. This recipe is a combination of both. Folks, are you ready to cook a hybrid mutton curry which is a Bengali cross Rajasthani breed? This sure is very spicy. You might wanna adjust the red chillies to suit your palate.

Ingredients:
Mutton – 1 kg
Tomatoes – 2 medium sized, chopped
Potatoes – 5-6 medium sized, peeled and cut into halves.
Curd – 1 cup
Turmeric powder – 1 tsp
Salt – to taste
Oil – 2-3 tbsp

To grind to a paste:
Onion – 3 medium sized
Ginger – 2” piece
Garlic – 7-8 pods

For the masala powder:
Red chillies – 10-15
Coriander – 1 tbsp
Cumin – 2 tsp
Cardamom – 2-3
Cloves – 4-5
Cinnamon – 1” stick

Method:

1. Marinate the mutton with onion-ginger-garlic paste, curd, turmeric powder and salt and keep in the refrigerator for a minimum of 30 mins, the longer the better.

2. Dry roast the ingredients called for under the masala powder head and grind them to a fine powder. ( I microwave the masalas instead on high for a min)

3. Heat oil in a heavy bottomed vessel. Add a tsp of salt and a pinch of turmeric powder. Drop in potato pieces on a high flame. Stir for 2-3 mins. Lower the flame and cook covered till the potatoes turn golden on all sides. Remove them from the oil and keep aside.

4. Heat oil in a heavy bottomed vessel and add the marinated meat along with chopped tomatoes and cook on a low flame. The meat gets cooked in its own juices. Occasionally stir and cook till all the water gets evaporated from the mutton and oil oozes out from the sides. This process might take an hour even.

5. Now combine the mutton, fried potatoes and the masala powder in a pressure cooker. Add water to suit your desired consistency. You may adjust salt at this stage. Pressure cook for 1 or 2 whistles.

6. I simply cook steamed rice to accompany this and none in my family complains coz they can wholly and solely indulge in this divine dish. One can have it with Indian bread if the gravy is cooked to thick consistency.

Ingredients:
Rice – 3 cups
Mutton or chicken – ½ kilo
Onions – 7-8 medium sized, finely chopped
Tomatoes – 3 medium sized, finely chopped
Vinegar – 1 tsp
Pudina leaves – 1 bunch (take the leaves only)
Coriander leaves – 1 bunch
Biriyani masala – 3 tsp
Rose water – 3 tsp
Kesar – 1 pinch
Milk – 2 tbsp
Ghee – 1 tbsp
Potatoes – 4 medium sized, peeled and cut into halves
Kala jeera – ½ tsp
Turmeric powder – ½ tsp
Oil – 2 tbsp

Whole garam masala for rice:
Tejpatta – 2-3
Cloves – 3-4
Cinnamon – 1”inch piece broken into small pieces
Cardamom – 3-4
Black pepper – 4-5
Jeera – 1 tsp
Red chilli – 1

For marination:
Curd – 1 cup
Ginger paste – 2 tbsp
Garlic paste – 1 ½ tbsp
Red chilli powder – 2 tsp
Turmeric powder – 1 tsp
Salt – 2 tsp

Method:

The ‘to be done and kept aside’ tasks:

Marinate the chicken / mutton pieces with the marinade ingredients and refrigerate for atleast half an hour (the more time the better).
Soak the rice in double the quantity of water for half an hour.
Heat oil in a pan. Add kala jeera, potatoes, turmeric powder and salt. Fry the potatoes till they turn golden brown.
Fry ½ cup of sliced onions till they are brown.
Soak kesar in milk. (If kesar is not available, you may use food color to give the rice yellow colour)

To prepare Rice:

Boil water in a vessel along with the whole garam masalas.
When the water starts boiling, add the rice, vinegar, salt and 1 tsp of oil.
Keep checking the rice until it is almost done but not fully done.
Strain the water away.
Immediately spread the rice in 2-3 plates. This prevents the rice from being sticky or stops it from cooking further.

The main dish (masala):
In a pan, heat oil and add tejpatta.
Add rest of the onions. Saute till they are golden brown.
Add the tomatoes and sauté till the oil separates.
Now add the marinated chicken or mutton and finely chopped pudina and coriander leaves along.
Add biriyani masala, fried potatoes and adjust salt.
Add a little water if required. The meat and potatoes should cook in this masala itself. (In case of lack of time, the meat and potatoes can be pressure cooked together. Saves a lot of time but the former method gives extra taste)
If there is any gravy left, heat till the water gravy evaporates and meat is left with thick masala.

Final set-up:
Take a heavy bottomed utensil where you would be setting up the Biriyani.
Grease the utensil with a little oil.
Divide the rice into 3 parts and the masala into 2.
Arrange the first part of rice in the utensil first.
Next put half of the masala.
Repaeat the rice – masala – rice layer again.
Decorate the fried onions on top.
Pour the kesar milk so that it is evenly spread across the utensil.
Pour the rose water similarly.
Put ghee on top evenly.
Place the utensil on the lowest heat.
If the ghee on top melts, then you may know that the biriyani is ready to be served.